Skip to main content

Posts

An Observation

Much has changed in the past few years, hell, much has changed in the past few weeks, but that’s another story... and I’ve found a little time on my hands in which to tidy things up. The world of non-functionals has never been so important and yet remains irritatingly ignored by so many - in particular by product owners who seem to think NFRs are nothing more than a tech concern. So if your fancy new product collapses when you get get too many users, is that ok? It’s fair that the engineering team should be asking “how many users are we going to get?”,   or “how many failures can we tolerate?” but the only person who can really answer those questions is the product owner.   The dumb answer to these sort of question is “lots!”, or “none!” because at that point you’ve given carte-blanche to the engineering team to over engineer... and that most likely means it’ll take a hell of a lot longer to deliver and/or cost a hell of a lot more to run. The dumb answer is also “only a couple” and “
Recent posts

Inter-microservice Integrity

A central issue in a microservices environment is how to maintain transactional integrity between services. The scenario is fairly simple. Service A performs some operation which persists data and at the same time raises an event or notifies service B of this action. There's a couple of failure scenarios that raise a problem. Firstly, service B could be unavailable. Does service A rollback or unpick the transaction? What if it's already been committed in A? Do you notify the service consumer of a failure and trigger what could be a cascading failure across the entire service network? Or do you accept long term inconsistency between A & B? Secondly, if service B is available but you don't commit in service A before raising the event then you've told B about something that's not committed... What happens if you then try to commit in A and find you can't? Do you now need to have compensating transactions to tell service B "oops, ignore that previous messag

Focus

I suspect most of us working in IT today use agile methodologies such as Kanban, Scrum and Safe. We also strive to keep up to date with the latest developments in languages, libraries, patterns, architectures etc. All of this is with the intent of improving the delivery speed, quality, efficiency, maintainability and the cost effectiveness of the systems we build - oh, and whilst improving our CVs at the same time. Care though is needed to ensure we don’t get distracted by these tools from delivering the solutions they were employed for. This often isn’t through any specific fault with the methods and tools themselves but how we set about using them.  There can often be a blinkered tendency to maniacally focus on the tools and methods themselves and in doing so fail to deliver most effectively on actual requirements and customer needs. If all you have is a hammer then everything looks like a nail. Worse still, the job can become about servicing the tools used to do the work rather than

A Years Worth

A few Christmases ago I was messing about creating bubble maps - no doubt in some mince pie and port induced state of inebriation (quality of code is consequently as you'd expect). I'd long forgotten about this until Kent Becks recent post on medium.com about trying to understand A Year's Worth of effort. This looked familiar and so with a little manipulation here's a simple utility to convert priority ordered stories into a visual bubble map .

SAFe Shite!

SAFe (Scaled Agile Framework - for which I will not provide the link because they don't deserve it) is worthless shite! It's just a bunch of practices developed elsewhere, rebranded by a cabal of consultants to cream money out of large organisations. The only additions it brings are there to placate management by helping mascarade traditional waterfall processes and hierarchical structures as "agile" - it does little to nothing new to actually change the org! Save your money and go open source with your processes. SAFe is bollocks!

SQL Server 2017 on Linux (mostly)...

Nice piece of work. Begs the questions when we'll see Windows for Linux though ;)